Psychologists delve into the mind of the terrorist

by Ezra Buckley on June 15, 2017

Scientific evidence challenges assumptions of madness and theories of radicalisation

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There must be a deviancy, an insanity even, that afflicts those who are motivated to kill for their beliefs. Such individuals — prepared to bomb a concert packed with children and teenagers or mow down pedestrians on a bridge — must lie somewhere on the spectrum of madness. This tempting rationalisation of terrorism has little basis in scientific evidence, according to psychologists. “It is not true that terrorists share a common psychological profile,” wrote Paul Gill and Emily Corner, from University College London. “No [single] mental health disorder appears to be a predictor of terrorist involvement.” READ MORE

 

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